DVD to Treat Apraxia in Toddlers and Young Preschoolers

Are you a parent looking for more information on childhood apraxia of speech?

Are you scared and confused by what you’re finding on the internet? ?

Then I’d like to introduce you to a DVD that’s made especially for parents to help you understand this complex diagnosis.Teach Me to Talk with Apraxia and Phonological Disorders

It’s called Teach Me To Talk with Apraxia and Phonological Disorders, and it was developed by pediatric speech-language pathologist Laura Mize, author of the website teachmetotalk.com.

In the last years Laura’s best-selling DVDs Teach Me To Talk and Teach Me To Listen and Obey have helped thousands of families in the United States and around the world understand expressive and receptive language delays. Now she’s using her parent-friendly, easy-to-understand approach to explain speech disorders.

Watch Laura as she not only explains the characteristics of apraxia, but shows you many, many examples of toddlers and young preschoolers who exhibit verbal motor planning difficulties. You’ll learn exactly how speech-language pathologists distinguish apraxia from other speech and language delays such as phonological disorders.

You’ll SEE demonstrations and explanations of the latest techniques experts recommend to help non-verbal toddlers first learn to imitate sounds and then begin to use words, phrases, and sentences.

If you’re having difficulty understanding what your young child is saying to you, this 3 hour DVD set will teach you step-by-step techniques to help your child learn to use speech you can understand. This will be invaluable information for parents with children who have been newly diagnosed with a speech delay or disorder including apraxia and phonological disorders.

More importantly, this DVD goes well beyond the diagnosis phase and explains all of the therapy techniques recommended by experts in the field. This DVD isn’t just a video-taped conference with a few clips of speech therapy.

In this comprehensive 3 hour, 2 DVD set, you’ll see dozens of real-life therapy sessions so that you can learn to understand and use these techniques at home with your young child diagnosed with apraxia. You’ll hear Laura explain the techniques and then see multiple demonstrations of each strategy with different children so that you can not only understand exactly what to do, but can be confident in implementing the same successful strategies with your own young child.

This DVD covers every important phase of speech-language development in young children. You’ll see techniques to use with toddlers who are non-verbal. Then you’ll watch children progress and find strategies to help them learn to use single words. Children with apraxia and phonological disorders also have difficulty using speech sounds correctly in words. They leave off or substitute consonant, and even, vowel sounds. You’ll learn several ways to help them learn new sounds. You’ll also see strategies to help children learn to make the leap from single words to phrases, and then finally, move on to using sentences.

If your child struggles to be understood and has been diagnosed with apraxia or phonological disorder, this DVD will clearly outline steps that you, as a parent, can use at home to help supplement the speech therapy your child is receiving. Children with parents who are involved in their child’s therapy have much better outcomes than children whose parents don’t participate. If you’ve been left wondering exactly HOW to work with your child with apraxia at home between speech therapy sessions, this DVD will teach you.

Additionally in each section Laura shares her best therapy resources so that you can locate and use the best treatment materials recommended for children with apraxia of speech. No more searching on the internet or pouring over catalogues to decide what will be appropriate and useful for your child as you work at home. You’ll receive many quality references for reputable and reliable information, all based on cutting-edge research and best practices in treating young children with apraxia and phonological disorders.

If you’re a pediatric speech-language pathologist or another early interventionist working with young children with speech disorders, this must-have resource will become a favorite resource in your library of treatment materials as you share information with families, train students, or offer clinical supervision to CFYs. SLPs love Laura’s down-to-earth and practical advice which will help you take your intervention from theory “to the floor.”

“I wanted to thank you for the new Phonological/Apraxia DVDs!!! As usual, you have put together a super video, chock-full of terrific ideas for parents! I also showed a bit of that one, as well as the other ones at our recent seminars….The response from the SLPs in the audience is universally great, and they all comment how much something like this is so needed.You’ve done all the work for them, so what a treat to have these available to loan the parents on our caseloads! -Patti Hamaguchi, M.A., CCC-SLP

I just love your playful manner with the kids, and the way you break down the suggested strategies and show how you implement them with actual children. Everyone also comments how they love the fact that you show real kids who don’t always cooperate, and how you handle it. So fabulous!! Thanks again.”

This is an excellent training DVD for parents of late talkers. The strategies that Laura teaches are the same ones she used when working with my son, who has apraxia of speech. My son made incredible progress working with Laura. These strategies are very effective and easy to apply to a variety of speech and Ianguage disorders. I wish all speech therapists possessed this level of knowledge and skill. As a Speech-Language Pathologist, I would recommend this DVD to my parents of late talkers and especially those diagnosed with apraxia. As a Mom of a late talker, I would recommend this DVD to all speech therapists working with children.
-Laurie Felty, Speech-Language Pathologist

Click here to be redirected to our store to order your 2 DVD set for Teach Me To Talk with Apraxia and Phonological Disorders today! (This set is also offered for special pricing when bundled with Teach Me To Talk: The DVD. Select the package “Both Apraxia and Talk DVDs.”)

To order through PayPal for orders inside the USA.

To order through PayPal for orders outside the USA:

If you’ve not yet ordered Laura’s first DVD Teach Me To Talk, it’s strongly recommended that you begin with techniques in that DVD first, before implementing the more advanced strategies in Teach Me To Talk with Apraxia and Phonological Disorders. With this special order you can order Teach Me To Talk for only $29.99 with the purchase of Teach Me To Talk with Apraxia and Phonological Disorders – that’s $10 off the regular price. 

Click here to be redirected to our store to order your 2 DVD set for Teach Me To Talk with Apraxia and Phonological Disorders today!?Look for the package that says “Both Apraxia and Talk DVDs.”

For the 3 DVD Set Teach Me To Talk + Teach Me To Talk with Apraxia and Phonological Disorders, click this button for orders inside the USA:

For orders outside the USA for the 3 DVD set Teach Me To Talk + Teach Me To Talk with Apraxia and Phonological Disorders, click this link:

Questions? Email me at?Laura@teachmetotalk.com.

Comments

  1. Nikki says

    Just finished watchin the “Teach Me To Talk” DVD this afternoon and enjoyed it so much! Will definitely be purchasing the Apraxia/Phonological Disorders one shortly. :) If only we could earn CEU’s while viewing these! :)

  2. Laura says

    Hi Laura,
    I was wondering if you still take clients? We are in the Louisville area and my daughter will turn 3 in June and transition out of first steps. Her current SLP is pretty sure she has CAS. And after watching your video, I agree. We love our therapist, but she mainly does first steps and is only in the clinic 1 day/week and I think we are going to need therapy more often than that.

  3. Laura says

    Laura – Yes, I see clients every day from both here in Lousivlle and from anywhere else in the country when their parents bring them to me! I’ve sent you an email to ask you some other questions, so check your inbox. If other parents want info – email me at Laura@teachmetotalk.com.

  4. Jana Green says

    Hi Laura, I got my dvds in the mail. I have watched the first disk once and plan to watch it at least two more times before I reallllly get started on using it.

    Thanks again for talking with me on the podcast. You’ve given me the confidence I need to stand my ground when it comes to Jakob’s therapy.

  5. Tanya says

    Hi Laura,

    I love your website and your videos (we have “Teach Me To Talk” and “Teach Me To Listen and Obey”). Our son is 2, nonverbal, and was recently diagnosed with (mild) autism. Before his diagnosis, I frequently used your website and videos to educate myself and answer the many questions I had about his expressive and receptive language delays.

    I have a growing concern that he’s not talking because he physically does not know how to use his mouth to make sounds. I spoke with his speech therapist about this and she thinks he is too young to consider apraxia or other motor planning difficulties (sorry if I’m not using the correct terminology, it’s still new to me). My question is…do you think this video will provide me with enough insight to move forward with a diagnosis or a plan of action? Thank you so much!

    Tanya

  6. Laura says

    Tanya – I’m so glad you found the other DVDs helpful. The Apraxia DVD is very comprehensive and will definitely give you a plan of action, with or without a formal diagnosis. Many children with autism often have difficulty with motor planning. I’m so glad you started with the basic strategies from Teach Me To Talk, and hopefully adding the ideas from Apraxia will work for you and your little boy to get him making sounds and then using words. Laura

  7. Laura says

    Dear Laura,

    I bought your Teach me to Talk and the two Apraxia DVDs a few months ago, and want to thank you for the difference they’ve been making to our family. My daughter, who is turning 2.5 yrs soon and has (is suspected to have) apraxia & a sensory processing disorder, has been making good steady progress thanks in part to us implementing your tips and strategies from the DVDs. Your DVDs also taught us how to be better advocates for our daughter.

    Thank you very much,

    Natasha

  8. Paola says

    I forgot to ask you about “outcomes”. How “normal” does an adult with Verbal Apraxia sounds?
    Thank you!

  9. Laura says

    Paola – Some adults with apraxia sound completely normal, some have only minor lingering problems like difficulty with multisyllabic words (like saying a long medical diagnosis or a phonetically complex word such as statistician), and some sound so different that everyone can tell something is wrong. Like any other diagnosis, there’s a severity range, so that a child with severe apraxia is more likely to struggle for a long time (maybe forever), whereas a child whose initial severity is milder and he responds well to therapy has a better chance at completely overcoming any problems. You can look on YouTube for examples of children and adults with apraxia, but there’s likely no one who will sound just like your child now or later. With apraxia there’s a huge variation in how children and adults sound. The best advice we can give parents is to get your child in therapy early and work with him at home. Wish I had a crystal ball for you! Laura

  10. Paola says

    Hi Laura! Thank you for your answer. That’s kind of what I thought. I also would like to tell you that I watched the dvds, and I have been working with my toddler a lot, but I do not know If I am doing it right. Is it useful to split the words in syllables and make him repeat them by syllables? Because as you said on another answer, he has problems to combine the syllables to form words, but he also has problems with some specific sounds, and of course with syllables too. I’m sorry, but this is hard for me. How many times you would say I should make him repeat a specific word, syllable or sound each day?
    Should I, then, target sounds, syllables, or words?
    I make a chart for each day and I am making check marks next to each word every time he says it.
    He is repeating so much more now, even though most of the time they sound completely different of what I said. It is still useful, right?
    Thanks to your dvds I learned how to make it fun for him, and he added 4 words (or approximations)to his repertoire in the last few days. I know other children are learning that many words or even more in one day, but I am really happy to see some progress.
    I am sorry for keep asking you so many things, but I am still fighting with my health insurance company. So far he is in a special center for children with communication problems, but they don’t have speech therapists there, so I want to work with him at home the most I can, and I don’t have anybody to guide me on the process.
    I want to tell you also that my husband watched one of the dvds with me and he realized that our son really has a problem, and that he won’t outgrow it. Thank you soooo much for that, I was feeling really lonely on this fight. Now, he tries to make him talk too!
    Thank you for all you do for children like mine! I wish I could take my son to have therapy with you. You really like what you do! I am using your dvds as inspiration tools! ja, ja. Thank you!
    Paola

  11. Laura says

    Paola – As a rule, you want to cue the entire word since he’s a new talker, and then you “fix” specific sounds and syllables once he is really imitating words well. For right now, just keep having him try to imitate words you say, even if it’s off-target. He needs to learn how fun it is to talk without the pressure of mommy over-correcting every little thing he tries to say. So for now, just focus on having FUN and counting each time he tries as success.

    I know how hard it is to learn to work with a child (that’s my job afterall), so keep at it Paola. It DOES get easier with practice, and don’t be so hard on yourself. You sound like you’re doing a great job. He’s adding words, and that is FANTASTIC!!! I wish I could be there in person to cheer you on, but you’ll have to read it on here. Based on what you’ve said, I think you are doing a great job, and let me reassure you, YOU CAN DO THIS!!! You are the most important teacher your little boy will EVER have, and congratulations for working so hard to learn how to help him. Email me anytime you need someone to give you a pep talk! And I’m very glad Dad has now come around and can be your partner in helping your little boy. Again, let me know how I can help you! Laura

  12. Paola says

    Thanks Laura! I’m going to keep working with him at home, and reading everything I get about Apraxia. Thank you for always answering so quick!

  13. Tanya says

    Hi Laura,

    I just received your Apraxia/Phonological Disorders DVD and it is another great one! Thank you for making this information available to us! I wish we lived closer to you so that we could bring our son in to see you!

    At any rate, I am through the first DVD and I just have to ask a question. My son is 2 years, 2 months old and was diagnosed with mild autism. At 18 months, he seemed to have no receptive language (and no expressive language), but by 19 months, his receptive language took off. He still doesn’t speak, but is saying more and more sounds through therapy (“uh” for “up,” and various consonant sounds). He also signs “more,” “please,” “thank you,” and “help.” He loves being around other kids, makes great eye contact, smiles, laughs, has a good sense of humor, and aside from not talking and a slight fixation with things that spin (especially fans!), nobody would ever guess that he has autism. So my question is…how do you know if a child has autism versus apraxia? He cannot blow and has no idea that he has a tongue in his mouth (we’ve been working on this for awhile now). He eats well and can suck through a straw (the kid loves to eat!), but other than that, he just doesn’t use his mouth to make funny noises, blow, etc. If I stick out my tongue and/or move it around, he laughs and thinks it’s a game, but he doesn’t imitate it. He does pretend play and imitate everything else in life, except for language and mouth activities. I know you can’t diagnose him without seeing him, but can apraxia appear to be autism in young children? I’m very confused, but we’re working on getting a new SLP to help navigate through this! I know the two can be seen in one child, and that’s fine, I’m definitely not trying to get away from autism, however, we just want to give him the blend of therapy that he needs (e.g. more speech instead of more ABA if needed).

    Thank you so much for your time, help, and all that you do for us parents!

    Tanya

  14. Laura says

    Tanya – Thanks for your great question. There’s so much to answer that Kate and I are going to talk about this on tomorrow’s podcast for May 13. You can call into the show and ask us yourself if you’d like, but we’re going to answer your questions anyway! Listen in and comment back if you need clarification. Thanks! Laura

  15. Tanya says

    Hi Laura,

    Thank yo sooooooo much! I will definitely be listening, and will call in if my son allows it (nobody wants to hear a screaming kid on a podcast!). :-)

    I just finished listening to last week’s podcast to make sure I understood mixed expressive-receptive language disorder. A few things that I noted specific to my son are that he didn’t point, clap, or wave “bye” until he was 18 months. Once he figured out how to do those things, he could point and show us what he knew…which was a lot more when we thought. That’s also when he started to sign (although I had been trying to teach him since he was six months old!). His ABA therapist says he’s the most mild case she’s ever seen, since he listens, follows directions, and tries REALLY hard to please her (and us!). He looks sincerely confused when we are asking for “duh” and he says “nuh.” (This was when I first started thinking that he was trying, but just didn’t know how to say things.)

    Also, in terms of his mouth…he was tongue-tied at birth, and it was snipped by an ENT at 3 weeks. He also has a high palate (not sure if that means anything, but the developmental ped pointed it out). When I was pregnant, I was high risk with polyhydramnios (too much amniotic fluid, which the doctor said was a sign of possible swallowing issues in the baby). Again, this may all be irrelevant, but I thought it was better to give more info.

    His joint attention is great (although it, too, picked up around 18 months). He likes to play social games and has started to cry when we don’t chase him and interact with him (this is new…he has always been more independent in his play). That being said, he loves to spin things and always has. He points out every ceiling fan he sees, but can be distracted by other items (although his default is always spinning things). I guess that’s plenty of background…I am sooooo excited to hear your professional discussion of autism and apraxia tomorrow! Thanks again for doing this!

    Tanya

  16. Janet says

    Will this help children with a tracheostomy? It’s not apraxia per se, but my son will be 2 next month, has had a trach since 5 months old, and makes only a few sounds with a speaking valve. We’re having a hard time finding anyone locally who knows what to do with him.

    He follows directions well, and appears to know about 100 signs, but will only sign a couple of signs to us.

  17. Laura says

    Janet – My DVDs include general speech-language strategies for parents to implement with their children at home. If you need help learning how to facilitate his signs/language at home, then the DVDs would be helpful for you. I do have a question – if he isn’t signing to you, who is he signing for? You’ll need to get that person to help him (and you!) to generalize those signs for everyday use. What good is knowing a sign if you can’t use it to communicate in real life?

    If he’s having speech production problems because of the trach, then you’re going to need a more specialized SLP. Try an SLP in a hospital or home health agency since these SLPs are medically based (vs. educationally based) and more likely have experience with trachs. If he’s in your state’s early intervention program, then call and ask for an SLP who likes to work with medically fragile kids since she will likely have had more experience with trachs. I hope you can find someone to help you!! Laura

  18. Treena says

    Hi Laura,

    My son has apraxia and I was wondering how the dvd’s work is it sign language or other tips etc. We work with a SLP and OT
    He is really starting to babble. They say his adjusted age is between 18-22 months. Is starting to babble a good sign? We get so excited to hear anything come out of his voice box. He wasn’t even able to blow bubbles until yesterday and then blew bubbles ALL DAY I would say this is progress .

    Thanks for your input

  19. Mandy says

    Laura – I posted a question about my son on the wrong page (the autism page) but have another question. My 20 month old doesn’t verbally imitate, only has the /d/ consonant, primarily grunts and points, and only has two words “ow” and “num” that he says spontaneously. He started speech therapy a month ago and although he doesn’t have any new consonants and still isn’t verbally imitating I have noticed he is using more “sounds” other than grunts, like /a/, /e/, and /o/. I talked to his therapist today (she is really nice and he loves her) and asked her about apraxia. She said that although he does have some signs that correspond with apraxia (open mouth posture, slight protruding tongue in addition to the above) she said that apraxia really can’t be diagnosed until he is “talking” or at least “imitating” as apraxia is also how a child talks as much as his early childhood symptoms and mouth posture. I completely understand what she is saying as I know that Apraxia can cause children to imitate wrongly or to drop parts of words. My question to you is, if it would be apraxia will traditional therapy help him to get to a point where we can either rule out or firmly diagnose apraxia? Or if it is apraxia will 6 months (less or more) even help him to start using consonants/sounds and imitate? I hope I worded that correctly – :)

  20. Kay says

    Hello – I have a question about apraxia with a 2 year old. My 2 year old has some problems sequencing but not with all words. She says “own” instead of no and duck is more like “cad”. I guess in a couple cases she basically says the last syllable first. Is this a red flag for apraxia or do some kids do this as part of ‘normal development’?

    She does not do it with all/most words but just a few words. She is picking up new words daily and is stringing together some great sentences (at least I think so) for a two year old “Mama all done eat”

    Thanks for the help

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